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RtI for Educators

RtI is a systematic framework to assure growth for all students.  It utilizes multi-tiered supports for academics and behavior, and is driven by data within the context of a preventative problem-solving process.  Essentially, RtI is the practice of: (a) providing high-quality instruction/intervention to all students and (b) using assessments to determine learning rate and level of performance to (c) make important educational decisions to guide instruction.

Frameworks
Elementary RtI Framework
Secondary RtI Framework
 

Implementation Rubrics

District Implementation Rubric
School Implementation Rubric

Classroom Implementation Rubric

Problem Solving Process

Problem Solving Process Logo

The importance of assessment and effective instruction for RtI cannot be overstated.  The problem-solving process serves as the overarching structure that drives assessment and intervention activities.  Therefore, problem-solving lies at the heart of RtI.  The following sequential four-steps of the problem-solving process are completed in all situations, whether addressing large groups (district or school-wide), smaller groups (grade-level or classroom), or individual children. The steps are the outline of an evidence-based method of investigation and can be organized in a series of questions that educators must answer if they are to improve students' learning opportunities.  These steps are more than procedural formalities and the most essential part of the process is obtaining positive outcomes (not just following the steps).  Data are gathered at each step, making it a data-based problem-solving process with the goal to make instruction more effective for learners, or "enabling learning" (Tilly, 2005).  Throughout the process, educators are working within a school-based team to consider student performance data to identify learning needs, to develop interventions to fill those needs, and to evaluate the effects of the intervention on the defined need. These foundational principles are embedded, with varying levels of intensity, in the problem-solving process and used across grade-level and building-level problem-solving teams.  

Recommended Guidelines

Elementary Building Problem-Solving
Elementary Grade Level Problem-Solving
Middle School Problem-Solving
Secondary Problem-Solving

Problem Solving Steps

Step 1: Define the Problem:

  • What specifically do we want students to know and be able to do when compared to what they do know and are able to do?
  • What, exactly, is the problem?

Step 2: Analyze the Problem:

  • What does the data tell us?
  • Why is/are the desired goal(s) not occurring
  • What are the barriers to the student(s) doing and knowing what is expected
  • Is it a can't do or a won't do?

Step 3: Develop and Implement the Plan

  • What is the goal? 
  • What are we going to do
  • What is the intervention
  • What is the plan to meet this goal (how, who, when)
  • How will it be progress-monitored?

Step 4: Evaluate the Plan

  • How will the integrity of the intervention be ensured
  • Is it working? If not, how will the instruction/intervention plan be adjusted to better support the student's or group of students' progress
  • What do we do next?

 

Multi-Tiered Approach

The problem-solving process is applied in a multi-tiered approach to providing services and interventions at increasingly intense levels based on student response to each intervention.  This multi-tiered system involves three tiers of support for students based upon level of need.  The first tier (core) consists of the core curriculum and general education program which is based on evidence-based practices.  The initial task in this process is to ensure that the core curriculum is effective for at least 80% of the students.

After demonstrating that the core curriculum meets needs of at least 80% of the students, the second tier (strategic) consists of supplemental instruction in addition to the core curriculum to support small groups of students in achieving growth academically and/or behaviorally.  Tier two supports are delivered in a small group format using strategies know to be effective in addressing these learners.

Tier three (intensive) supports are designed to be individualized and long-term for students who either need enrichment or have not responded to Tier 1 and Tier 2 interventions and supports that have been delivered with a high level of fidelity.

At all tiers, the four-step problem-solving process is used to maximize the outcomes for all students.  Thus, the problem-solving process first assures the success of large numbers of students, then narrows the focus to small groups, finally delivering maximum supports to individual students.

Progress Monitoring

Progress Monitoring: using data to track students’ progress toward a goal
 

Elementary

Secondary

ACADEMICS - READING
What do we use? 

  • DIBELS Next-Progress Monitoring

SURVEY-BAC

Who progress monitors?

  • One of the licensed teachers who is providing reading instruction to the student will progress monitor the student.  

How often do we progress monitor? 

  • Tier 1 - During Benchmarking Periods (special considerations for those close to benchmark)
  • Tier 2 - 1-2 times/month
  • Tier 3 - 3-4 times/month

Who needs the progress monitoring data?

  • All teachers within the grade-level team for problem-solving purposes.

How do we progress monitor?

 

ACADEMICS - READING
What do we use?

  • Reading CBM


How often we monitor progress?

  • Tier 1 - Department-level Decision
  • Tier 2 - 1-2 times/month
  • Tier 3 -3-4 times/month

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEHAVIOR

What do we use?

  • SWIS Data

 

How often do we progress monitor? 

  • Tier 1 - Grade-level Decision
  • Tier 2 - 1-2 times/month
  • Tier 3 -3-4 times/month

BEHAVIOR
What do we use?

  • SWIS Data

 

How often do we progress monitor? 

  • Tier 1 - Department-level Decision
  • Tier 2 - 1-2 times/month
  • Tier 3 -3-4 times/month

Core/Tier 1 Resources

Two Column Layout

 

ACADEMIC RESOURCES

     ELEMENTARY RESPONSE CHARTS

     SECONDARY RESPONSE CHARTS

     Characteristics and Classroom Issues - Wendy Behrens Presentation
      TIER 1 Student Form-Secondary

      Interventions for Written Language Output

 

    CLOSE READING
       MARKING THE TEXT
    ONE-ONE-TWO MINUTE PARTNER SHARE
       PHILOSOPHICAL CHAIR
     RECIPROCAL TEACHING
       SOCRATIC SEMINAR

     TEAM HUDDLE

     FRY Word Lists

Fry First 100

Fry Second 100

Fry Third 100

 

 

READING WEBSITES

Vaughn-Gross Center for Reading and Language Arts

http://www.meadowscenter.org/vgc

 

Reading Rockets

http://www.readingrockets.org

 

The Florida Center for Reading Research

http:///www.fcrr.org

 

Free Reading

freereading.net

 

Tier 2 Resources

Tier 3 Resources

INTERVENTIONS... WHERE TO START

DESCRIPTIONS of ACADEMIC INTERVENTIONS

ACADEMIC RESOURCES

ELEMENTARY OPTIONS - READING

 

SECONDARY OPTIONS - READING

  • CORRECTIVE READING
  • READ 180
  • READ NATURALLY
  • READ TO ACHIEVE
  • SYSTEM 44

Assessment

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CONTACT

Department of Teaching & Learning
Dr. Heather Mueller, Director
10 Civic Center Plaza, Suite 2
Mankato, Minnesota 56001
507-387-1868
hmuell1@isd77.org